Speakers

r/evolutions in audio technology

Scott Fisher

Scott Fisher is a Professor in the Media Arts + Practice Division, founding Chair of the Interactive Media Division, and Associate Dean of Research at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. He is an interaction designer whose work focuses primarily on mobile media, interactive environments and technologies of presence. He is also Director of USC’s Mobile and Environmental Media Lab.

Fisher’s media industry experience includes Atari, Paramount, and his own companies Telepresence Research and Telepresence Media, and he is well known for his pioneering work in the field of Virtual Reality at NASA. A graduate of MIT’s Architecture Machine Group (now Media Lab), he has taught at MIT, UCLA, UCSD, and Keio University in Japan. His work has been recognized internationally through numerous invited presentations, professional publications and in the popular media. In addition, he has been an Artist in Residence at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies and his stereoscopic imagery and artwork has been exhibited in the US, Japan and Europe

Raymond Goldsworthy

Ray Goldsworthy is an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology in the Keck School of Medicine. Ray’s research concerns auditory perception for cochlear implant users. A cochlear implant is a medical device that restores hearing to deaf people. These devices have been remarkably successful and have paved the way for other medical bionics. While cochlear implant technology has improved dramatically over recent decades, they fall short for providing the high resolution needed for music appreciation and spatial hearing. Ray’s driving passion is to improve these devices for both music perception and spatial hearing. Ray is himself a cochlear implant user, and consequently, personally aware of the importance of music and immersive listening in everyday experience.

Correlations Between Pitch and Phoneme Perception in Cochlear Implant Users and Their Normal Hearing Peers. J Assoc Res Otolaryngol. 2015 Dec; 16(6):797-809. View in: PubMed

Two-microphone spatial filtering provides speech reception benefits for cochlear implant users in difficult acoustic environments. J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Aug; 136(2):867. View in: PubMed

Two-microphone spatial filtering improves speech reception for cochlear-implant users in reverberant conditions with multiple noise sources. Trends Hear. 2014; 18. View in: PubMed

Training improves cochlear implant rate discrimination on a psychophysical task. J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Jan; 135(1):334-41. View in: PubMed

Psychoacoustic and phoneme identification measures in cochlear-implant and normal-hearing listeners. Trends Amplif. 2013 Mar; 17(1):27-44. View in: PubMed

Analysis of speech-based Speech Transmission Index methods with implications for nonlinear operations. J Acoust Soc Am. 2004 Dec; 116(6):3679-89. View in: PubMed

Sally-anne Kellaway (Ossic)

Sally-anne Kellaway is the Creative Director at OSSIC, and is the biggest VR audio nerd you’ll ever meet.  This brings together some of Sal’s favourite things – daydreaming, evangelising cool things, organising things and Audio Design for VR.  Sal is still riding the VR hype train because she believes VR is the future of entertainment, or the world in general.  Sal is enabling this future by founding the Virtual Reality Content Creators network for Australia (VRCC_AUS) and communicating about the power of Audio in VR.
Sally presents at conferences worldwide about VR, the role of Audio in Virtual Reality, and research conducted from her Masters course in Audio and Acoustics and Diversity in STEAM fields.  Sal has been named as one of MCV Pacific’s Most Influential Women in Games, and in the MCV Pacific and the Develop 30 Under 30, as well as one of Variety’s 10 VR Innovators to Watch.

 

Noah Kraft (Doppler Labs)

Noah Kraft is the CEO and co-founder of Doppler Labs, a San Francisco-based technology company on a mission to make computing more immersive and human. After years of work, the company recently announced its flagship product, Here One: the first all-in-one wireless listening system that redefines how we engage with sound through technology. Here Active Listening (TIME magazine’s Best Invention of 2015), the predecessor to Here One, was released in January 2016 to an exclusive group of early adopters, influencers, and partners.

Noah’s bold vision to revolutionize how we hear the world has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, Inc., WIRED, USA Today, Forbes, Rolling Stone, and many more. Noah was named one of Inc.’s 2016 30 Under 30.

r/evolutions in everyday listening

Bill Whittington 

William Whittington, Ph.D. is the author of Sound Design and Science Fiction (University of Texas Press, 2007) and co-editor of Spectatorship: Shifting Theories of Gender, Sexuality and Media (University of Texas Press, 2017). He is the Assistant Chair of Cinema & Media Studies in the School of Cinematic Arts, where he teaches courses in film and television history, genre, audio and digital culture, film and Buddhism, adaptation, and contemporary LGBT media. Between 1993-1997, he served as the curator of the USC Warner Bros. Archives, assisting with research on various films, documentaries, music scores and books. He has also worked as an editor for Time Warner Trade Publishing, specializing in the production of audiobooks. His scholarly work includes articles and interviews on genre, audio and digital culture, museums and media technology, and he is currently writing a new book entitled: Sound Design and Horror (forthcoming). Links to his work can be found at: http://usc.academia.edu/WilliamWhittington

Erkki Huhtamo 

Professor Erkki Huhtamo is a shared professor between the Departments of Design Media Arts, and Film, Television, and Digital Media. He holds a PhD in Cultural History from the University of Turku, Finland. He is a media archaeologist, author, and exhibition curator. At DMA his areas are the history and theory of media culture and media arts. He is internationally known as a pioneer of an emerging approach to media studies called media archaeology. It excavates forgotten, neglected and suppressed media-cultural phenomena, helping us to penetrate beyond canonized “grand narratives” of media culture. Professor Huhtamo pays particular attention to the “life” of topoi, or clichés and commonplaces that emerge over and over again within media history and provide “molds” for new experiences. What may seem new things often prove to be just newly packaged ideas repeated during hundreds and even thousands of years. Professor Huhtamo has applied this approach to phenomena like “peep media” (a notion he has coined), the screen, panoramas and dioramas, video games, and mobile media. He has also written about the work of many media artists, including Paul deMarinis, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Golan Levin, and Bernie Lubell. Professor Huhtamo’s most recent books are Media Archaeology. Approaches, Applications, and Implications (ed. with Dr. Jussi Parikka, University of California Press, 2011) and the large monograph Illusions in Motion. Media Archaeology of the Moving Panorama and Related Spectacles (The MIT Press, 2013). He is currently working on a number of new books: a media archaeology of interactive media (The MIT Press, under contract), a history of mechanical theaters and a theoretical volume tentative titled “Media Archaeology as Topos Study.”

Professor Huhtamo has curated numerous exhibitions and events, including the major international exhibition Alien Intelligence (KIASMA Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, 2000). He has served in many art exhibition and festival juries, including Siggraph, Ars Electronica, and the Interactive Media Festival. His writings have been translated into twelve languages, with new single-authored books in Italian and Japanese coming in 2014-2015. Huhtamo has lectured widely in Europe, the United States, Japan, and elsewhere, and written and directed television series about media culture, including Archaeology of the Moving Image (YLE, The Finnish Broadcasting Corporation, 1995-96). Professor Huhtamo has also adapted his ideas to stage works. In 2005-06 he performed a multi-media performance titled Musings on Hands with acclaimed media artists Golan Levin and Zachary Lieberman (Tmema) at Waseda University’s Ono Memorial Hall, Tokyo, and at the Ars Electronica 2006 festival in Linz, Austria. More recently Professor Huhtamo introduced Mareorama Resurrected, a stage work that features a reconstruction of a nineteenth-century moving panorama and live piano music (performed so far in Los Angeles, Chicago, and Pittsburgh), and From Dole to the Pole, or Professor Huhtamo’s Daring Adventures (Los Angeles, 2012). The latter performance features authentic nineteenth-century magic lanterns and hand-painted lantern slides, live music, and ‘follies’ sound effects. Professor Huhtamo owns an extensive collection of antique optical viewing devices and documents, such as magic lanterns, peep show boxes, camera obscuras, praxinoscopes, kinoras, etc., which he often demonstrates to his students.

http://www.erkkihuhtamo.com

Yon Visell

Dr. Visell’s directs the RE Touch Lab, leading fundamental and applied research on the future of interactive technologies.  His research includes haptic engineering and perception, robotics, human-computer interaction, analog, digital, and spatial sound, motivated by emerging opportunities in human-computer interaction, sensorimotor augmentation of the human body, soft robotics, and interaction in virtual reality.  He has authored more than 60 scientific articles, and has edited two books on immersive virtual reality.

Dr. Visell is a faculty member at UC Santa Barbara, in the Media Arts & Technology Program, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and Mechanical Engineering Department (by courtesy). Trained in engineering and physics, he received the PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from McGill University, and MA and BA degrees in Physics from The University of Texas, Austin and Wesleyan University.

Dr. Visell spent more than five years in sound, signal processing, and interactive technology research at leading technology companies. He was the lead DSP developer for Ableton Live, authoring an array of sound processing algorithms that are now used in music production across the globe. He undertook speech recognition research at Vocal Point Inc., now part of Nuance (makers of Siri), and sonar R&D at ARL Austin. He worked in interactive art and design R&D at FoAM, Belgium, at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, and at the art+technology organization Zero-Th, which he co-founded in 2005. His artistic works have exhibited at some of the most prominent cultural venues in the world.  Since 2015, he has hosted The Unknown Territories, a weekly radio broadcast about contemporary science and experimental music.

Dr. Visell’s directs the RE Touch Lab, leading fundamental and applied research on the future of interactive technologies.  His research includes haptic engineering and perception, robotics, human-computer interaction, analog, digital, and spatial sound, motivated by emerging opportunities in human-computer interaction, sensorimotor augmentation of the human body, soft robotics, and interaction in virtual reality.  He has authored more than 60 scientific articles, and has edited two books on immersive virtual reality.

Dr. Visell is a faculty member at UC Santa Barbara, in the Media Arts and Technology Program, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and Mechanical Engineering Department (by courtesy). Trained in engineering and physics, he received the PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from McGill University, and MA and BA degrees in Physics from The University of Texas, Austin and Wesleyan University.

Dr. Visell spent more than five years in sound, signal processing, and interactive technology research at leading technology companies. He was the lead DSP developer for Ableton Live, authoring an array of sound processing algorithms that are now used in music production across the globe. He undertook speech recognition research at Vocal Point Inc., now part of Nuance (makers of Siri), and sonar R&D at ARL Austin. He worked in interactive art and design R&D at FoAM, Belgium, at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, and at the art+technology organization Zero-Th, which he co-founded in 2005. His artistic works have exhibited at some of the most prominent cultural venues in the world.  Since 2015, he has hosted The Unknown Territories, a weekly radio broadcast about contemporary science and experimental music.

re-touch-lab.com

r/evolutions in sound practice

Miller Puckette

Miller Puckette obtained a B.S. in Mathematics from MIT (1980) and Ph. D. in Mathematics from Harvard (1986). Puckette was a member of MIT’s Media Lab from its inception until 1987, and then a researcher at IRCAM (l’Institut de Recherche et de Coordination Musique/Acoustique, founded by composer and conductor Pierre Boulez). There he wrote the Max program for MacIntosh computers, which was first distributed commercially by Opcode Systems in 1990 and is now available from Cycling74.com . In 1989 Puckette joined IRCAM’s “musical workstation” team and put together an enhanced version of Max, called Max/FTS, for the ISPW system, which was commercialized by Ariel, Inc. This system became a widely used platform in computer music research and production facilities. The IRCAM real-time development team has since reimplemented and extended this software under the name jMax, which is distributed free with source code.

Puckette joined the Music department of the University of California, San Diego in 1994, and is now Associate Director of the Center for Research in Computing and the Arts (CRCA). He is currently working on a new real-time software system for live musical and multimedia performances called Pure Data (“Pd”), in collaboration with many other artists/researchers/programmers worldwide. Pd is free and runs on Linux, IRIX, and Windows systems. Since 1997 Puckette has also been part of the Global Visual Music project with Mark Danks, Rand Steiger, and Vibeke Sorensen, which has been generously supported by a grant from the Intel Research Council.

Shane Myrbeck

Shane Myrbeck is a sound artist, composer and acoustician based in Oakland. Shane’s work explores the visceral and immersive nature of sound through spatial audio systems and architectural form, and he engages its uncanny ability to transform and direct experience. Many of Shane’s pieces involve site-specific multichannel audio installations. His work has been exhibited at the Huntington Gardens, World Science Festival, Dolby Gallery, the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, Goldenvoice’s Panorama Festival, Fort Mason Center, Gray Area Foundation for the Arts, California Academy of Sciences, the Contemporary Jewish Museum, Proxy, the Hosfelt Gallery, SPUR, the Lab, IBM Tokyo and on the streets of San Francisco. Recent residencies include Montalvo Arts Center, San Francisco’s Exploratorium and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Shane is also an Associate at the global architectural engineering firm Arup. He is based in San Francisco’s Acoustics, Audiovisual and Theatre consulting team, where he is a project design lead and valued creative mind. In addition to architectural project work and internally-funded psychoacoustic research, Shane leads the SF SoundLab, an immersive sound studio used for acoustic simulation of architectural spaces, sonic VR experiences, soundscape design and new compositions. The Arup SoundLab has been on the forefront of immersive sound for experiential design for nearly two decades, employing technologies such as ambisonics, wave field synthesis and binaural presentation. Some of Shane’s recent Arup project work includes SFMOMA, the Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, SFOpera and many others.
Nonny De La Peña

Nonny de la Peña is the founder and CEO of Emblematic Group, a digital media company focused on immersive virtual, mixed and augmented reality since 2007. She is widely credited with helping create the genre of immersive journalism with a catalog of VR films, covering topics from the Trayvon Martin murder to the Syrian civil war – domestic violence to global warming.

Nonny is referred to as the “Godmother of Virtual Reality” by Forbes, Engadget and The Guardian. Additionally, Fast Company named her “One of the People Who Made the World More Creative.” Her VR documentaries have been showcased around the world, including the Moscow Museum of Modern Art and Sundance, Tribeca and Venice film festivals.

Through Emblematic, Nonny has partnered with Google, The New York Times, Planned Parenthood and The Wall Street Journal. Her most recent collaboration was with PBS’s flagship program FRONTLINE for a series of in-depth virtual experiences, including ‘After Solitary,’ which won the World VR Forum’s Imperial Crown and VR/Room-Scale Jury Award at SXSW.

Nonny is a 2018 New America National Fellow, member of the BAFTA VR Advisory Group, a TED Speaker and the 2016 recipient of the Knight Innovation Award.

Viktor Phoenix

Viktor Phoenix is  a Supervising Sound Editor, ADR Supervisor, and Technical Sound Designer for video games, virtual reality experiences, and 360 videos. His focus is on interactive and 3D sound.

Viktor’s passion for creativity and technology began as a child when, at the age of 6, he wrote programs in BASIC on a TRS-80 computer and played them back from the tape drive. He moved to hardware samplers and drum machines in high school, eventually working with computer based DAW (digital audio workstations) programs in the ’90s.

His professional career with video games and film began shortly after moving to Los Angeles in 2000, adding audio for virtual reality in 2014 and 360 videos in 2015.

Scott Looney

Scott R. Looney has always been interested in the creation and performance of compelling sounds across a broad spectrum of contemporary, improvised, and experimental music. He has studied composition and improvisation with Roscoe Mitchell, Wadada Leo Smith, Morton Subotnick, David Rosenboom, and Frederic Rzewski, obtaining his MFA in Composition from California Institute of the Arts.

After moving to New York, and finally to the San Francisco Bay area, he became more interested in expanding the timbral possibilities of the piano, and using pianists such as Denman Maroney as a starting point, has forged a signature style using the inside and outside of the piano, plucking strings, using metal implements and other quick preparations, in combination to playing the piano normally. He has also developed a flexible, expressive voice with electronics using Max/MSP which is as effective as his many piano textures are.

Scott has recorded and/or performed with Oliver Lake, Frank Gratkowski, Wolfgang Fuchs, Jon Raskin (of the ROVA Saxophone Quartet), Joelle Leandre, Henry Kaiser, Gianni Gebbia, Gino Robair, Joe Morris,, and Paul Smoker, to name a few. He has played in numerous local and international festivals such as the Ulrichsberger Kaleidophon, San Francisco Electronic Music Festival, Olympia Experimental Festival, Big Sur Experimental Music Fest, and the Line Space Line Festival in LA.