Speakers

Keynote Speaker

Frances Dyson, Ph.D.

Frances Dyson is Emeritus Professor of Cinema and Technocultural Studies at the University of California, Davis, and Visiting Professorial Fellow at the National Institute for Experimental Arts, University of New South Wales.

r/evolutions in audio technology

Scott Fisher

Scott Fisher is a Professor in the Media Arts + Practice Division, founding Chair of the Interactive Media Division, and Associate Dean of Research at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. He is an interaction designer whose work focuses primarily on mobile media, interactive environments and technologies of presence. He is also Director of USC’s Mobile and Environmental Media Lab.

Fisher’s media industry experience includes Atari, Paramount, and his own companies Telepresence Research and Telepresence Media, and he is well known for his pioneering work in the field of Virtual Reality at NASA. A graduate of MIT’s Architecture Machine Group (now Media Lab), he has taught at MIT, UCLA, UCSD, and Keio University in Japan. His work has been recognized internationally through numerous invited presentations, professional publications and in the popular media. In addition, he has been an Artist in Residence at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies and his stereoscopic imagery and artwork has been exhibited in the US, Japan and Europe

Raymond Goldsworthy

Raymond Goldsworthy is Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery in USC’s Keck School of Medicine. His publications include:

Correlations Between Pitch and Phoneme Perception in Cochlear Implant Users and Their Normal Hearing Peers. J Assoc Res Otolaryngol. 2015 Dec; 16(6):797-809. View in: PubMed

Two-microphone spatial filtering provides speech reception benefits for cochlear implant users in difficult acoustic environments. J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Aug; 136(2):867. View in: PubMed

Two-microphone spatial filtering improves speech reception for cochlear-implant users in reverberant conditions with multiple noise sources. Trends Hear. 2014; 18. View in: PubMed

Training improves cochlear implant rate discrimination on a psychophysical task. J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Jan; 135(1):334-41. View in: PubMed

Psychoacoustic and phoneme identification measures in cochlear-implant and normal-hearing listeners. Trends Amplif. 2013 Mar; 17(1):27-44. View in: PubMed

Analysis of speech-based Speech Transmission Index methods with implications for nonlinear operations. J Acoust Soc Am. 2004 Dec; 116(6):3679-89. View in: PubMed

Jason Riggs (Ossic)

Jason is a technology executive and CEO of OSSIC. Jason formed the Acoustical Engineering Department at Logitech, where oversaw the development of over 100 audio products helping grow the revenue of the Audio Business Unit from 100M to 500M/yr. Jason was CTO and later CEO of Carbon Audio. In 2014 he co-founded OSSIC, whose mission is to create the ultimate 3d listening experience.

Noah Kraft (Doppler Labs)

Noah Kraft is the CEO and co-founder of Doppler Labs, a San Francisco-based technology company on a mission to make computing more immersive and human. After years of work, the company recently announced its flagship product, Here One: the first all-in-one wireless listening system that redefines how we engage with sound through technology. Here Active Listening (TIME magazine’s Best Invention of 2015), the predecessor to Here One, was released in January 2016 to an exclusive group of early adopters, influencers, and partners.

Noah’s bold vision to revolutionize how we hear the world has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, Inc., WIRED, USA Today, Forbes, Rolling Stone, and many more. Noah was named one of Inc.’s 2016 30 Under 30.

r/evolutions in sound practice

Miller Puckette

Miller Puckette obtained a B.S. in Mathematics from MIT (1980) and Ph. D. in Mathematics from Harvard (1986). Puckette was a member of MIT’s Media Lab from its inception until 1987, and then a researcher at IRCAM (l’Institut de Recherche et de Coordination Musique/Acoustique, founded by composer and conductor Pierre Boulez). There he wrote the Max program for MacIntosh computers, which was first distributed commercially by Opcode Systems in 1990 and is now available from Cycling74.com . In 1989 Puckette joined IRCAM’s “musical workstation” team and put together an enhanced version of Max, called Max/FTS, for the ISPW system, which was commercialized by Ariel, Inc. This system became a widely used platform in computer music research and production facilities. The IRCAM real-time development team has since reimplemented and extended this software under the name jMax, which is distributed free with source code.

Puckette joined the Music department of the University of California, San Diego in 1994, and is now Associate Director of the Center for Research in Computing and the Arts (CRCA). He is currently working on a new real-time software system for live musical and multimedia performances called Pure Data (“Pd”), in collaboration with many other artists/researchers/programmers worldwide. Pd is free and runs on Linux, IRIX, and Windows systems. Since 1997 Puckette has also been part of the Global Visual Music project with Mark Danks, Rand Steiger, and Vibeke Sorensen, which has been generously supported by a grant from the Intel Research Council.

Shane Myrbeck

Shane A. Myrbeck is a sound artist, composer and acoustician living in Oakland. Shane’s work explores the visceral and immersive nature of sound through spatial audio display, architectural form and multi-sensory phenomena. His work has been exhibited at the World Science Festival, the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, Fort Mason Center, Gray Area Foundation for the Arts, California Academy of Sciences, Proxy, the Hosfelt Gallery, the ODC Theatre, IBM Tokyo and on the streets of San Francisco. Recent residencies include San Francisco’s Exploratorium and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Shane spends his professional life as an architectural acoustics designer at Arup, and is a technical lead for the SoundLab, an immersive, full-sphere ambisonic sound studio used for composition and acoustic simulation

 

Recruited to Microsoft in the late ’90s, Summers was responsible for the release of their first multiplayer Internet game, Fighter Ace, a precursor to the rise of online gaming. Summers was subsequently selected as the company’s first Audio Technical Evangelist, in which capacity she was responsible for launching innovative audio technologies such as DirectMusic (a revolutionary method of creating and delivering interactive music and sound design) and also dramatically increasing the use of Windows as a platform for audio creation.

With the inception of Microsoft’s Xbox game system in 2000, Summers was tapped to help design and promote the audio capabilities of the new hardware

Viktor Phoenix

Viktor Phoenix is  a Supervising Sound Editor, ADR Supervisor, and Technical Sound Designer for video games, virtual reality experiences, and 360 videos. His focus is on interactive and 3D sound.

Viktor’s passion for creativity and technology began as a child when, at the age of 6, he wrote programs in BASIC on a TRS-80 computer and played them back from the tape drive. He moved to hardware samplers and drum machines in high school, eventually working with computer based DAW (digital audio workstations) programs in the ’90s.

His professional career with video games and film began shortly after moving to Los Angeles in 2000, adding audio for virtual reality in 2014 and 360 videos in 2015.

Scott Looney

Scott R. Looney has always been interested in the creation and performance of compelling sounds across a broad spectrum of contemporary, improvised, and experimental music. He has studied composition and improvisation with Roscoe Mitchell, Wadada Leo Smith, Morton Subotnick, David Rosenboom, and Frederic Rzewski, obtaining his MFA in Composition from California Institute of the Arts.

After moving to New York, and finally to the San Francisco Bay area, he became more interested in expanding the timbral possibilities of the piano, and using pianists such as Denman Maroney as a starting point, has forged a signature style using the inside and outside of the piano, plucking strings, using metal implements and other quick preparations, in combination to playing the piano normally. He has also developed a flexible, expressive voice with electronics using Max/MSP which is as effective as his many piano textures are.

Scott has recorded and/or performed with Oliver Lake, Frank Gratkowski, Wolfgang Fuchs, Jon Raskin (of the ROVA Saxophone Quartet), Joelle Leandre, Henry Kaiser, Gianni Gebbia, Gino Robair, Joe Morris,, and Paul Smoker, to name a few. He has played in numerous local and international festivals such as the Ulrichsberger Kaleidophon, San Francisco Electronic Music Festival, Olympia Experimental Festival, Big Sur Experimental Music Fest, and the Line Space Line Festival in LA.

r/evolutions in everyday listening

Bill Whittington 

William Whittington, Ph.D. is the author of Sound Design and Science Fiction (University of Texas Press, 2007) and co-editor of Spectatorship: Shifting Theories of Gender, Sexuality and Media (University of Texas Press, 2017). He is the Assistant Chair of Cinema & Media Studies in the School of Cinematic Arts, where he teaches courses in film and television history, genre, audio and digital culture, film and Buddhism, adaptation, and contemporary LGBT media. Between 1993-1997, he served as the curator of the USC Warner Bros. Archives, assisting with research on various films, documentaries, music scores and books. He has also worked as an editor for Time Warner Trade Publishing, specializing in the production of audiobooks. His scholarly work includes articles and interviews on genre, audio and digital culture, museums and media technology, and he is currently writing a new book entitled: Sound Design and Horror (forthcoming). Links to his work can be found at: http://usc.academia.edu/WilliamWhittington

Erkki Huhtamo 

Professor Erkki Huhtamo is a shared professor between the Departments of Design Media Arts, and Film, Television, and Digital Media. He holds a PhD in Cultural History from the University of Turku, Finland. He is a media archaeologist, author, and exhibition curator. At DMA his areas are the history and theory of media culture and media arts. He is internationally known as a pioneer of an emerging approach to media studies called media archaeology. It excavates forgotten, neglected and suppressed media-cultural phenomena, helping us to penetrate beyond canonized “grand narratives” of media culture. Professor Huhtamo pays particular attention to the “life” of topoi, or clichés and commonplaces that emerge over and over again within media history and provide “molds” for new experiences. What may seem new things often prove to be just newly packaged ideas repeated during hundreds and even thousands of years. Professor Huhtamo has applied this approach to phenomena like “peep media” (a notion he has coined), the screen, panoramas and dioramas, video games, and mobile media. He has also written about the work of many media artists, including Paul deMarinis, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Golan Levin, and Bernie Lubell. Professor Huhtamo’s most recent books are Media Archaeology. Approaches, Applications, and Implications (ed. with Dr. Jussi Parikka, University of California Press, 2011) and the large monograph Illusions in Motion. Media Archaeology of the Moving Panorama and Related Spectacles (The MIT Press, 2013). He is currently working on a number of new books: a media archaeology of interactive media (The MIT Press, under contract), a history of mechanical theaters and a theoretical volume tentative titled “Media Archaeology as Topos Study.”

Professor Huhtamo has curated numerous exhibitions and events, including the major international exhibition Alien Intelligence (KIASMA Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, 2000). He has served in many art exhibition and festival juries, including Siggraph, Ars Electronica, and the Interactive Media Festival. His writings have been translated into twelve languages, with new single-authored books in Italian and Japanese coming in 2014-2015. Huhtamo has lectured widely in Europe, the United States, Japan, and elsewhere, and written and directed television series about media culture, including Archaeology of the Moving Image (YLE, The Finnish Broadcasting Corporation, 1995-96). Professor Huhtamo has also adapted his ideas to stage works. In 2005-06 he performed a multi-media performance titled Musings on Hands with acclaimed media artists Golan Levin and Zachary Lieberman (Tmema) at Waseda University’s Ono Memorial Hall, Tokyo, and at the Ars Electronica 2006 festival in Linz, Austria. More recently Professor Huhtamo introduced Mareorama Resurrected, a stage work that features a reconstruction of a nineteenth-century moving panorama and live piano music (performed so far in Los Angeles, Chicago, and Pittsburgh), and From Dole to the Pole, or Professor Huhtamo’s Daring Adventures (Los Angeles, 2012). The latter performance features authentic nineteenth-century magic lanterns and hand-painted lantern slides, live music, and ‘follies’ sound effects. Professor Huhtamo owns an extensive collection of antique optical viewing devices and documents, such as magic lanterns, peep show boxes, camera obscuras, praxinoscopes, kinoras, etc., which he often demonstrates to his students.

http://www.erkkihuhtamo.com

Yon Visell

Dr. Visell’s directs the RE Touch Lab, leading fundamental and applied research on the future of interactive technologies.  His research includes haptic engineering and perception, robotics, human-computer interaction, analog, digital, and spatial sound, motivated by emerging opportunities in human-computer interaction, sensorimotor augmentation of the human body, soft robotics, and interaction in virtual reality.  He has authored more than 60 scientific articles, and has edited two books on immersive virtual reality.

Dr. Visell is a faculty member at UC Santa Barbara, in the Media Arts & Technology Program, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and Mechanical Engineering Department (by courtesy). Trained in engineering and physics, he received the PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from McGill University, and MA and BA degrees in Physics from The University of Texas, Austin and Wesleyan University.

Dr. Visell spent more than five years in sound, signal processing, and interactive technology research at leading technology companies. He was the lead DSP developer for Ableton Live, authoring an array of sound processing algorithms that are now used in music production across the globe. He undertook speech recognition research at Vocal Point Inc., now part of Nuance (makers of Siri), and sonar R&D at ARL Austin. He worked in interactive art and design R&D at FoAM, Belgium, at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, and at the art+technology organization Zero-Th, which he co-founded in 2005. His artistic works have exhibited at some of the most prominent cultural venues in the world.  Since 2015, he has hosted The Unknown Territories, a weekly radio broadcast about contemporary science and experimental music.

Dr. Visell’s directs the RE Touch Lab, leading fundamental and applied research on the future of interactive technologies.  His research includes haptic engineering and perception, robotics, human-computer interaction, analog, digital, and spatial sound, motivated by emerging opportunities in human-computer interaction, sensorimotor augmentation of the human body, soft robotics, and interaction in virtual reality.  He has authored more than 60 scientific articles, and has edited two books on immersive virtual reality.

Dr. Visell is a faculty member at UC Santa Barbara, in the Media Arts and Technology Program, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and Mechanical Engineering Department (by courtesy). Trained in engineering and physics, he received the PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from McGill University, and MA and BA degrees in Physics from The University of Texas, Austin and Wesleyan University.

Dr. Visell spent more than five years in sound, signal processing, and interactive technology research at leading technology companies. He was the lead DSP developer for Ableton Live, authoring an array of sound processing algorithms that are now used in music production across the globe. He undertook speech recognition research at Vocal Point Inc., now part of Nuance (makers of Siri), and sonar R&D at ARL Austin. He worked in interactive art and design R&D at FoAM, Belgium, at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, and at the art+technology organization Zero-Th, which he co-founded in 2005. His artistic works have exhibited at some of the most prominent cultural venues in the world.  Since 2015, he has hosted The Unknown Territories, a weekly radio broadcast about contemporary science and experimental music.

re-touch-lab.com

Marko Peljhan

A native of Slovenia and a theatre and radio director by profession, Peljhan founded the arts and technology organization Projekt Atol in the early 90’s and cofounded one of the first media labs in Eastern Europe, LJUDMILA in 1995. In the same year, the founded the technology branch of Projekt Atol called PACT SYSTEMS where he developed one of the first Global Positioning Systems based participatory networked mapping projects, the Urban Colonisation and Orientation Gear 144. He has been working on the Makrolab, a project that focuses on telecommunications, migrations and weather systems research in an intersection of art and science from 1997-2007, the Interpolar Transnational Art Science Constellation during the International Polar Year (project 417) and is currently coordinating the Arctic Perspective Initiative art/science/tactical media project focused on the global significance of the Arctic geopolitical, natural and cultural spheres together with Matthew Biederman.  Peljhan has also been the flight director of ten parabolic experimental flights in collaboration with the Microgravity Interdisciplinary Research initiative and the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre, creating conditions for artists to work in alternating gravity conditions. During the series of World Information.org projects, he has installed several communications mapping and interception systems and projects and his research led him to map the command and control communications networks and response during the Srebrenica genocide. He is the recipient of many prizes for his work, including the 2001 Golden Nica Prize at Ars Electronica together with Carsten Nicolai for their work, polar, and the  UNESCO Digital Media Prize for Makrolab in 2004. During 2008, Peljhan was appointed as one of the European Union Ambassadors of Intercultural dialogue. His work was exhibited internationally at multiple biennales and festivals (Venice, Gwangju, Brussels, Manifesta, Johannesburg, Istanbul), at the documenta X in Kassel, several ISEA exhibitions, several Ars Electronica presentations and major museums, such as the P.S.1 MOMA, New Museum of Contemporary Art, ICC NTT Tokyo, YCAM Yamaguchi, Van Abbemuseum and others. From 2009 on he is the one of the series editors of the Arctic Perspective Cahiers series (Hatje Cantz and API).He  holds joint appointments with the Department of Art and the Media Arts & Technology graduate program at the University of California Santa Barbara, and was appointed as Co-Director of the Univerisy of California system-wide Institute for Research in the Arts in 2009, where he is coordinating the art/science Integrative methodologies initiative.  He is also the director of the MAT Systemics Lab, located in Elings Hall.